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Joe Macca: Two Man Show 2018-02-15T19:09:42+00:00

Joe Macca: Two Man Show

The Lost Chord - 2 - The Art Gym at Marylhurst UniversityThe Lost Chord - 3 - Ping Pong Table - The Art Gym at Marylhurst UniversityThe Lost Chord - 4 - NW View - The Art Gym at Marylhurst UniversityThe Lost Chord - 5 - The Art Gym at Marylhurst UniversityThe Lost Chord - 7 - SW View - The Art Gym at Marylhurst UniversityThe Lost Chord - 6 - Lamp - The Art Gym at Marylhurst University

Joe Macca: Two Man Show

Many artists work in several veins, often distinguished by medium—painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture—and sometimes by subject matter. What has puzzled me about Joe Macca’s output is that he works in ways that are polar opposites—hot/cold, perfect/messy, slow/fast, meditative/mad. This is what led me to propose the exhibition Joe Macca: Two Man Show.

Macca creates paintings that are carefully planned and perfectly executed abstractions that respond to the natural world or, as the artist puts it, that express the “literal and symbolic, ephemeral and transient.” In contrast to the pulsating calm or dark interiority of those paintings, the postcards and studio flotsam run the gamut from rude and crass jabs at his fellow artists to mockingly self-aggrandizing promotions of Macca the artist, Macca the man. They are the vehicle for much that annoys him, with particularly barbed attacks reserved for the art world with its hubris and system of winner-take-all.

Accompanying Joe Macca: Two Man Show is the P.O.’d Postcard Show, a small exhibition of postcards and other correspondence by Mack McFarland and Anna Gray and Ryan Wilson Paulsen. Over the years, I have received many interesting postcards, painted envelopes and objects through the mail. For the P.O.’d Postcard Show I was looking for mailed art that commented on society or the artworld or both. McFarland’s Ten-foot-pole drawings of politicians and policy-makers that he presumably would not touch with a ten-foot-pole fit the bill, as did Gray and Wilson Paulsen’s series of mailed posters commenting wryly on contemporary art practice.

Curated by: Terri Hopkins

On View: April 16 – May 18, 2012