Regional Legacy 2018-03-01T18:12:06+00:00

The Belluschi Pavilion

Pietro Belluschi originally designed the Belluschi Pavilion for the Griffith family of Lake Oswego, who lived in the small, economic home from 1951-2001. A leader of the mid-century modern style, this precursor to the tiny house movement was saved from demolition and reconstructed on the Marylhurst campus in 2013. The Belluschi Pavilion serves as a lasting tribute to the architect and as an educational venue for diverse exhibitions and events.

To host your own event at the Belluschi Pavilion, please visit the Marylhurst Events page. 

The Belluschi Pavilion Wins DeMuro Award, 2017

The Restore Oregon DeMuro Award “honors extraordinary historic rehabilitation projects and compatible infill development across Oregon…The DeMuro Award is the only state-wide award in Oregon recognizing the creativity, persistence, and craftsmanship required by outstanding restoration projects.”

Pictured here: Art Gym Director Ashley Stull Meyers with Marylhurst University President Melody Rose receiving the DeMuro Award

Lee Kelly at Marylhurst

Lee Kelly, known as “Oregon’s Sculptor,” has been creating artwork in the Pacific Northwest since 1949. Kelly is known for his monumental, modernist, steel sculptures which can be found installed in quiet Portland pastures, in polished foyers and collections across the nation, and right here on the bucolic Marylhurst University campus. Kelly has exhibited at Marylhurst in 1980, 1983, and 1994.

Kelly’s steel sculpture Broken Landscape (1969), a gift to the Marylhurst Collection from Art Advocates, is installed on campus today. Kelly says this transitional work “consciously [begins] to deal with [the space inside the sculpture]” literally offering an interior space for a viewer to sit within the form.